Diabetes Adulting Hack

A few months ago I was invited to a local T1D meet up. About ten or so hungry peeps with diabetes met up at a restaurant in Philadelphia, and I was grateful to be among friends.

One of the fun and interesting things about sitting at a table with a bunch of other T1Ds is that my Omnipod PDM was among many on the table. My friend Roz picked mine up and when she hit the home button and the screen came up, she realized it wasn’t hers – and she noticed something else, too.

She noticed something that I have always done with my Omnipod PDM, which she called a “diabetes adulting hack,” and she encouraged me to share it, which is what prompted this post.

One time in my beginning stages using Omnipod about six years ago, I left the PDM (essentially the receiver needed to bolus, change sites, and everything else that controls the pump) at a restaurant.

Since there are no tubes connecting the pump to my body, I have to be very mindful to make sure I have it with me at all times (although the Omnipod will still continue to deliver basal insulin no matter whether the PDM is near or far, which is a feature I like.)

As you may know, the feelings of dread and anxiety involved when a piece of your pump or CGM equipment is broken or lost is palpable to say the least since you will have to either find it, replace it, and/or go back to manual injections until you are able to get a hold of a PDM. Either way, not having your PDM will be taking up ALL of your thought cycles until you get it back!

I am a particularly proactive person in general and intentionally do whatever I can to make my life easier in the case that something does go wrong, and in this case I had done something prior to this occurrence to help ensure that if I ever did lose my PDM, anyone who found it would know exactly what to do:

I put my phone number on the front screen which is always the first thing you see when you press the home button to operate the pump.

We received a call from the restaurant saying they had found my cellphone (LOL – most people would have no idea what the PDM was if they found it randomly) and boy was I grateful they did.

Since then, I highly recommend everyone who has an Omnipod does the same thing. First, enter your phone number, then your name as shown in the pic. That way you have an extra layer of insurance if you ever leave your PDM somewhere out in the wild.

This has been your diabetes adulting hack of the day, because, well, adulting with diabetes is hard! Diabetes on, my friends! 🙂

Please share this with anyone who could benefit from doing this for themselves or their kids!

Comments

  1. Thank you for such an informative blog. Read all your blog

  2. WALTER WASYLKO says:

    Re: Diabetes Adulting Hack
    How secure is one’s insulin pump or CGM data or personal information on these diabetes platforms? We have reports from AI experts that it’s quite easy to hack into one’s insulin pump & change insulin doses.
    We know from recent hearings in Congress personal data on Facebook & other social media isn’t secure & is being used far & wide for various purposes.

    • DiabetesDominator says:

      Although it may be possible (can’t find any stories of any incidents of this happening in real life to prove that it is possible at this current time), I feel that the benefits of using a pump and CGM far outweigh the risk of hacking for me personally. If you have any links to any information from the AI experts you mention that you could share with me, that would be great. Thanks for reading!

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